Banner
Home      Log In      Contacts      FAQs      INSTICC Portal
 
Documents

Keynote Lectures

Earth Observation in Service of Terrestrial Ecosystems' Monitoring
Ioannis Manakos, Information Technologies Institute, Centre for Research and Technology Hellas, Greece

Integration of Multiple Spatiotemporal Demographic Data and Its Applications for Disaster Mitigation Planning
Toshihiro Osaragi, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan

Comparison of Various Types of Land Use and Land Cover Data and Example of Their Harmonisation
Lena Halounova, Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic

 

Earth Observation in Service of Terrestrial Ecosystems' Monitoring

Ioannis Manakos
Information Technologies Institute, Centre for Research and Technology Hellas
Greece
 

Brief Bio
Ioannis Manakos is a Principal Researcher at the Information Technologies Institute of the Centre for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH/ITI) since 2012. He has worked for 7 years as the Head of the Department of Geoinformation in Environmental Management at the International Centre for Advanced Mediterranean Agronomic Studies (CIHEAM) at the Mediterranean Agronomic Institute of Chania (still an Adjunct Professor there). He carried out his PhD in Forestry at the Technical University of Munich. He has coordinated or participated in more than 36 European and National research and development projects under various funding frameworks (incl. FP6, FP7, H2020). Within the recently completed BIO_SOS FP7 Space, H2020 ECOPOTENTIAL, and ongoing H2020 E-SHAPE, SnapEarth, Nextland, and WQeMS projects, he developed and applies Earth Observation online data services’ modules and open data cubes for the calculation of Essential Variables related to Environmental Monitoring on land and water. He chaired the European Association of Remote Sensing Laboratories (EARSeL) from 2012 till 2014. He is the active Chairman of the Special Interest Group ‘RS in Land Use & Land Cover’ of the EARSeL. He serves as an active contributing member to the GEO Global Ecosystem Initiative (GEO ECO) and in the new Ecosystem Function Working Group (ECOFUN) of the GEO Biodiversity Observation Network Flagship (GEOBON) within the Group on Earth Observations. His activity is also recognized at the newly established Mediterranean Regional Information Network (MedRIN) and the South Central and Eastern European Regional Information Network (SCERIN) of the GOFC-GOLD (Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics) and GTOS (Global Terrestrial Observing System), where he serves as Lead in relation with the evaluation of the Global Land Cover Maps. He is also an active collaborator of the NASA LCLUC Program and member in the Copernicus Academy.


Abstract
Research in the environmental sector is growing in importance over time due to its strong relation to human wellbeing. Ecosystems supply provisioning goods, fulfil regulation and maintenance functions and deliver cultural services. All these benefits are crucial for human wellbeing and for the sustainable development of societies. EO plays an important role in their assessment, because it can be used for quantitative evaluation. Developments take place at an accelerating pace at global scale supported by the launching of international and European initiatives and programmes (e.g. Aichi Targets, Convention on Biological Diversity - CBD indicators, GEO BON, GEO ECO Initiative, ECO FUN, Copernicus Services, Mapping and Assessment of Ecosystems and their Services - MAES, European Nature Information System - EUNIS, Sustainable Development Goals - SDGs, H2020 relevant projects – e.g. E-SHAPE, ECOPOTENTIAL). New monitoring methodologies are now available that combine approaches in geo- and biosciences, remotely sensed data and in-situ observations. Satellite missions, such as the European Sentinels, provide a large amount of high-quality primary and secondary derived data useful for monitoring the environment and ecosystems. In-situ data are being organized and made available through international activities, such as the International Long-Term Ecological Research (ILTER) network and the Critical Zone Exploration Network (CZEN). Ecosystem models capable of assimilating the information from EOs are being developed. Recent technological advances, among others the Open Data Cube technologies and the ECOPOTENTIAL EODESM online tool, deliver unique capabilities to track changes in unprecedented detail using EO data, enabling effective responses to problems of national and international significance and considered supportive to ecosystem status assessments. Let us convene and discuss together about aforementioned, exchange experiences and knowledge during the 6th GISTAM event in Prague.



 

 

Integration of Multiple Spatiotemporal Demographic Data and Its Applications for Disaster Mitigation Planning

Toshihiro Osaragi
Tokyo Institute of Technology
Japan
 

Brief Bio
Toshihiro Osaragi is Professor of School of Environment and Society, Tokyo Institute of Technology. He has served as Associate Professor in the same institution before, and was Visiting Researcher at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis (CASA), University College London. He received his Doctor's degree of Architecture and Building Engineering from Tokyo Institute of Technology. He was one of the founders of Geographic Information Systems Association (GISA, Japan) and serving as Chairman of GISA currently. His areas of specialization include a wide range of cross-disciplinary fields. One of his main research projects has focused on how urban models and GIS technologies can support the spatial planning of our environment. As part of a long-standing interest in the transition process of land use, he has proposed a number of models to describe and simulate the dynamic changes of land use in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area. As for the planning support systems of public amenities, his research on public libraries has been well received. In recent years he has concentrated on some research projects, which are relating to disaster mitigation planning and operated under the full sponsorship of the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) and Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). In these projects, spatiotemporal distribution of people in a city is estimated, and pedestrian simulation models are being constructed for describing evacuation behavior or returning home behavior of stranded people, together with some models describing building collapse, road-blockage, and fire spreading. He received some best paper awards at international conferences, which include GISTAM 2020, EnviroInfo 2019, ISCRAM 2017, AGILE 2013, AGILE 2012, and so on, by presenting research relating to the projects.


Abstract
There is a growing demand for data that facilitate highly accurate understanding of the spatiotemporal distribution of both moving and static occupants in urban areas. Currently, a large amount of population data are available, however none of the data provide an accurate understanding of the numbers and departure/arrival locations of moving people using detailed units of space and time. Also, their detailed attributes such as age, sex, and occupation, are not provided either. In this keynote lecture, we would like to introduce some methods to address aforementioned issues, and illustrate some numerical examples.
First, after evaluating the strength and weakness of existing population statistics, which are available in Japan, we propose a method based on maximum likelihood method is investigated for using their strengths to best advantage and compensating for weaknesses. The proposed method is then validated by comparing with another flow data, which featured spatiotemporal data including departure/arrival locations, and demonstrate that the present procedure provides accurate estimates for population flows. This method makes it possible to analyse urban regions from new and never-before employed points of view by identifying the number of transient occupants and their travel directions at any time on high level of detail.
Next, we construct a model that provides spatiotemporal distribution of occupants in urban areas that vary according to clock time, location, and building use classification. The time, location, and building use classification are employed as keys to integrate demographic information. Weekday and weekend data for the central wards of Tokyo are employed to create estimates of the number of occupants with their detailed attributes. Using numerical examples, we demonstrate that the proposed model can provide demographic spatiotemporal distributions with far higher value than before; in which the buildings people occupy, their reasons for being there, their sex and age bracket, and their residential locations, can all be identified.
Finally, we will demonstrate the application examples of integrated demographic data. When a large earthquake occurs, many people are presumed to have difficulty in returning home. However, no research has been achieved yet to discuss the congestion of supporting facilities for stranded people in terms of site, the number and spatial distribution. To address this problem, we construct a simulation model, which describes people’s behavior such as returning home or going to other facilities after an earthquake occurs. Using the model, we estimate the congestion of facilities which varies according to day of the week or the time when the event occurs, and demonstrate the effective methods for reducing the congestion, which include offering information for people and cooperation of private institutions.



 

 

Comparison of Various Types of Land Use and Land Cover Data and Example of Their Harmonisation

Lena Halounova
Czech Technical University in Prague
Czech Republic
 

Brief Bio
Since graduation from the Czech Technical University in Prague (Faculty of Civil Engineering), Lena Halounová remained within its walls during her Ph.D. at the Department of Hydrotechnics, and then moved to the Remote Sensing Laboratory of the Department of Mapping and Cartography, which she is heading today. In her research, Lena pays special attention to issues of using optical and SAR remote sensing data and GIS applications for solving problems of water engineering, erosion, reclamations, landslides, land subsidence, detection of vegetation in urban areas, change detection in urban areas, etc. Numerous works and publications of Lena Halounová as well as her lectures in Prague universities are dedicated to these topics. Along with being appointed the Chairperson of the Czech Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing in 2004, Lena represented the Czech Republic, the ISPRS ordinary member, where she held the position of the Chairperson of the Financial Commission from 2008 to 2012. During the XXII ISPRS Congress in Melbourne, Lena was elected the Director of the 2016 ISPRS Congress, which was held in Prague, July 12-19, 2016 where she was elected ISPRS Secretary General for the next ISPRS inter-congresses periods.


Abstract
Maps, “images showing the Earth surface“, have been in existence for several thousand years. Nowadays, every country has its own set of topographic and thematic maps. All maps belong to the national and international wealth of individual countries and regions. Land cover maps show the distribution of the physical and biological cover of the Earth surface in predefined land cover classes. There are examples when the land nomenclature is combined with the land use nomenclature. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), land use is a collection of adjustments, activities and inputs that people make in a certain type of land cover. The land cover/land use (LC/LU) topic has been a matter of research for more than 40 years. It has a complicated history which consists of data compiled by many experts, in different ways and using various methods, and for a variety of purposes. Therefore, the LC/LU data differ in various characteristics – geographic coverage, time resolution, scale, processing, data sources, etc. Remote sensing data - results of the Earth observation – formed, in fact, a basis of LC/LU maps together with in-situ data, and still has been playing the main role in data source. The present world has been increasingly analysed in larger areas with a raising amount of applications of LC/LU data which exceed sizes of individual countries and bring new applications. The amount of users of LU/LC data is growing and therefore there are new requirements for such data. It is mainly the variety of land cover/land use classification systems that limits the compatibility and comparability of existing land use/land cover data. It makes analysis of such data – already ready to use - a very difficult task. The presentation is focused on an overview of global, regional and national land cover/land use data from various views which we have collected for a running project named Geoharmonizer: EU-wide automated mapping system for harmonization of Open Data based on FOSS4G and Machine Learning (No. 2018-EU-IA-0095). The second part shows results of a part of the project dedicated to the harmonisation process of two existing European land cover/land use classification systems and its problems.



footer